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More on Employers Pushing the Rising Cost of Healthcare onto Employees, Families

The Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and Educational Trust (HRET) perform an annual survey regarding the nature of employer-sponsored health benefits at nonfederal private and public companies nationwide. This is the twelfth such survey. The results are grim, for employees at least.

It’s no longer news that healthcare costs are on the rise. Most have begun to brace themselves for cost increases as a result of healthcare reform. In our recent blog post on the NNNN survey we reviewed the plans of large employers to pass the cost increase onto employees in 2011. For the most part, we are prepared to see our healthcare costs rise after the reform takes effect. But we don’t have to wait to feel these increases. Across the board, the average employee has already seen these increases. The survey certainly shows increases- especially in premiums for family and individual plans. The most notable increase may be that seen in the employee contribution.

Historically, employers and employees have shared the burden of rising premium costs. In 2010, however, employers did not increase their dollar-amount contribution. As a result, employee contribution rose 14% from 2009. Employer contribution did not rise.

The survey reports that 27% of employees have deductibles of $1,000 or more for single coverage. This is up from 22% in 2009. The average deductible is considerably less for workers with PPOs or HMOs. Prescription drugs, physicians visits, and preventative care are usually covered (with, of course, a co-pay or coinsurance) before a deductible is met. The out-of pocket maximum varies considerably for workers and plans.

Where are you better off, a large firm or a small firm? For the most part, it’s hard to tell. But, if you’re hoping to pay less of your premium, start sending your resume to small companies. 35% of employees at small firms pay nothing towards single coverage premium and 13% pay nothing towards family coverage. Only 6% at large firms pay nothing for single coverage and 1% towards family coverage.

Employers were not shy about reporting the changes nor the reasons for them.  Increased cost sharing, reduction in the scope of coverage, and increased employee contribution were all responses to the poor economy.

Keep in mind that this survey was conducted from January to May 2010. After our previous post on Large Employers passing rising health costs onto employees, we can only imagine what the survey will show in 2011.

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