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Archive for April, 2011

Protect Yourself from Counterfeit Products and Medications

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Johnson & Johnson recently discovered fake diabetes test strips in India – these strips were found in their ongoing worldwide effort to eradicate counterfeit and tampered products.

Johnson & Johnson suspects the strips were made in China and repackaged in counterfeit packaging in India (a whole production).

The good news for American consumers is that Johnson & Johnson has seen no evidence of fake OneTouch strips in the U.S. over the past three years; however, counterfeits continue to periodically crop up in other countries, including Egypt last year and Pakistan in 2009.

How can you, as a consumer, protect yourself from tampered products and medications?
The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and the FDA provide great resources for consumers.

Some of their tips include:

  • Read the label. Be alert to the tamper-evident features on the package before you open it. These features are described on the label.
  • Inspect the outer packaging for signs of tampering before you buy a product.
  • Examine the medicine itself before taking it. Check for capsules or tablets that differ from the others that are enclosed. Do not use medicine from packages with tears, cuts, or other imperfections.
  • Never take medicine in the dark.
  • Examine the label and the medicine every time you take it or give it to someone else.
  • Tell somebody if the product doesn’t look right. Do not buy or use medicine that looks suspicious. Always tell the store manager about questionable products so that they can be removed.
  • Before buying any medicine, you should stop and take a look. Before taking it, you should look again.

Ensuring Safe Use of Medicine

Thanks for reading!

Your healthcare resource – Rebecca Busch

Chicago – New Healthcare Fraud Hot Bed?

Tuesday, April 19th, 2011

Medicare fraud is hitting Chicago – hard. Chicago’s vulnerable population of senior citizens is receiving the brunt of the fraud, with the unethically targeting nursing homes and elderly living communities. A recent scheme involving elderly immigrants and durable medical equipment was snuffed out by authorities, but not before the fraudsters stole Medicare ID numbers.

Other recent Chicago healthcare fraud schemes include:

Dr. Jaswinder Rai Chhibber, owner of Chicago’s Cottage Grove Community Medical Clinic – charged with ordering unnecessary diagnostic tests for seniors and other patients in an effort to boost revenues from Medicare and Medicaid. Tests included echocardiograms, electrocardiograms and lung function tests, among others.

Marilyn Maravilla, a Chicago nurse, and four others were charged in a criminal complaint with paying kickbacks to various health care providers in exchange for referrals to her agency, Goodwill Home Healthcare Inc. of Lincolnwood. This fraud is part of a bigger, $200 billion scheme brought down by the HEAT taskforce.

Virgilio Orillo and Merigrace Orillo, owners of Chicago’s Chalice Home Healthcare Services Inc., were charged in a criminal indictment with falsifying documents in an effort to boost Medicare payments. The alleged scam, according to the government: Patients were listed as being homebound and in need of skilled assistance when it wasn’t true. (Medicare pays for home health care only for patients who meet these criteria.)

Thanks for reading!

Your healthcare resource – Rebecca Busch

Counterfeit Drug Update

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

Text messages to combat counterfeit drugs:

In Africa, counterfeit drugs are a growing health concern. Some estimates say that nearly 50% of the drug supply is counterfeit. What is one way to combat this growing epidemic? Text messages. That’s right, African’s can submit a verification code hidden in the medicines packaging and submit it to a service to verify whether it is authentic. This pedigree system puts the power back into patient’s hands.

Medicine supply chain breach – worst ever

A British man was found guilty and sentenced to eight years for his involvement in a scheme known as Operation Singapore, which centered on the importation of more than two million doses of counterfeit life-saving medicines into the country.

More than half of these were captured by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, but a huge amount – almost 900,000 doses – initially reached pharmacies and patients.

Despite an immediate recall of the drugs Zyprexa (olanzapine), Plavix (clopidogrel) and, Casodex (bicalutamide), 700,000 doses were left unaccounted for, putting the health of consumers in jeopardy.

Fake drugs are threatening public health

Consumers look to the FDA and the National Agency for Food, Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) to prevent counterfeit drugs from breaching the system. What strong holds are they putting into place to combat this growing problem?

“Recent developments have revealed that only a cross-functional and integrated approach can be successful in defeating counterfeiting and fraud as well as the diversion of pharmaceutical products. That is why the use of these anti-counterfeiting technologies should be embraced extensively by consumers of pharmaceuticals products and pharmaceutical companies should equally employ security technologies in packaging, primarily to support product authentication, provide an indication of a drug purity and allow supply chain to be tracked.”

To read more about new initiatives visit here.

Thanks for reading!

Your healthcare resource – Rebecca Busch