Medical Business Associates, Inc. Patient Hotline: 877-MBA-UWIN (877-622-8946)
Website
Web
Twitter
Twitter
Mail
Mail
Training Institute
Training
We Understand How Information and Money Move In Healthcare
 
     

Posts Tagged ‘informed patient’

Cutting Healthcare Costs through Patient Advocacy

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

During a recent conversation with a colleague, she informed me how she has been responsible for taking care of her elderly mother, driving her to appointments, filling her prescriptions, etc. She mentioned that her mother’s previous doctor always ordered tests – looking at her bone density, mammograms, chest X-rays – the whole nine yards. Initially, this didn’t surprise me, her mother is 87 and has emphysema and osteoporosis – the doctor is just trying to keep her healthy. However, after my colleague enlightened me, I thought about the subject a little differently.

First of all, let’s look at the age. Her mother is 87. She has stated repeated that these tests hurt her (mammograms especially, and she has very sensitive skin that tears easily). Even if these tests were positive or showed some sort of abnormality, she would most likely elect not to have surgery, radiation, or other forms of treatment.  Her mother’s attitude, “I am 87, I want to live a pain free, non-complicated life. Going to the doctor every month isn’t fun for me, or my daughter who has to take work off in order to drive me.”

I mentioned previous doctor in the first paragraph because my colleague’s mother was so fed up with all these tests and appointments that she went to a new doctor. The new doctor was very candid. She said, “Yes, I can order these tests. Yes, I could see you once a month. However, you’re pretty healthy and these tests aren’t going to tell us anything that we don’t already know, or that we could fix.” Now, the doctor could have been reimbursed by Medicare and secondary insurance for these tests – the mother wouldn’t have had to “pay” out-of-pocket anything. But, in that sense, we all are paying for unnecessary tests and visits.

This is only part of the problem. Luckily my colleague and her mother were informed enough to understand that they can say, “No” to these unnecessary tests and procedures. Other individuals might be scared into participating. This is an instance were having a patient advocate on hand, informing the patient of his/her rights would be ideal. A second ear to listen to diagnoses and conditions, and a trained mind to realize that an elderly person who is sensitive might not want these tests because they hurt or the results won’t produce anything the person doesn’t already know.

The moral of this story is to speak up when communicating with your physician. If you find yourself wondering why your physician is ordering tests, consult with another physician. Patients can cut healthcare costs on the front end by being savvy consumers.

Thanks for reading!

Your healthcare resource – Rebecca Busch